Science Re-Cap of Week – 01/23/16

Science Re-Cap of Week – 01/23/16

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Its been a wild week over on the MostlyScience facebook page. But if you missed some of our posts, fear not! We have your re-cap right here.

1) Why you should probably not eat snow. A recent study published in the journal Environmental Research shows that snow attracts pollutants from the air in levels that surpassed the detection limit. One conclusion to draw to draw from the study is that living in a snowy environment was potentially good for your health, as the snow drew the pollutants from the air you breathe.

2) The ultra-violent origins of gold: It seems supernovas aren’t enough. Nature has an even more extreme way of making heavy elements. And we may be on the point of observing the distortions of space-time caused in the process

3) Scientists have developed an injectable bone cement foam to repair broken bones and solve problems related to other bone diseases. The new study, published in Acta Biomaterialia, could mean new treatments for osteoporosis and traumatology.

4) EPFL scientists have developed a new method that helps cells turn into usable stem cells. The approach involves “squeezing” cells with a gel, and paves the way for large-scale production of stem cells for medical purposes.

5) New Nasa office will protect the Earth from asteroids. If fears of an asteroid destroying the planet keep you up at night, Nasa has some potentially reassuring news for you — it’s officially establishing an asteroid detection program.

6) A really nice wee run down of the differences you can find between science and pseudoscience. “Knowing science does not mean simply knowing scientific facts. It means understanding the nature of science—the criteria of evidence, the design of meaningful experiments, the weighing of possibilities, the testing of hypotheses, the establishment of theories, the many aspects of scientific methods that make it possible to draw reliable conclusions about the physical universe.”

7) Scientists have created a chicken embryo with a dinosaur-like snout instead of a beak. The researchers altered the molecular processes that leads to beak development in chickens (which are a distant relative of the dinosaurs). This amazing work has been published in the journal Evolution by scientists from Yale and Harvard.

8) Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless.In one study, 50% of people who take the test twice arrive at different Myers-Briggs classifications, and they were only tested five weeks apart. The video is great, check it out.

9) Possible 9th planet identified.”This would be a real ninth planet. There have only been two true planets discovered since ancient times, and this would be a third. It’s a pretty substantial chunk of our solar system that’s still out there to be found, which is pretty exciting.”—Mike Brown, the Richard and Barbara Rosenberg Professor of Planetary Astronomy

For more great stuff don’t forget to checkout our facebook page!

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Hacking Health Toronto 2013

Hacking Health Toronto 2013

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This past November I had the amazing opportunity to participate in the Hacking Health hackathon right here in Toronto. The event brings together healthcare professionals and technology developers to collaborate and build solutions to existing health care problems.

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Berry Go Round #62

Berry Go Round #62

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This month MostlyScience is proud to host Berry Go Round #62. If you are unfamiliar with BGR, it is a blog carnival devoted to highlighting recent blogging on the science of plants.

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5 Cancer Myths Exposed

5 Cancer Myths Exposed

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We have all seen it before, Facebook and Twitter posts of cancer facts, shared and re-tweeted across the sea of social media. Sometimes it’s obvious when an article is fake or trying to sell you something, sometimes it’s straight forward when it comes from a trusted source as real, but sometimes it blurs the lines

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Bioluminescence Lakes

Bioluminescence Lakes

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This weeks photo is from Phil Hart, it is one of the most popular photos seen online when talking about bioluminescence and was taken at the Gippsland Lakes Gippsland, Victoria, Australia.

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Hawaii’s Kīlauea Volcano

Hawaii’s Kīlauea Volcano

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Kīlauea Volcano Photo by USGS

In this edition of Science Picture of the Week, we look at Hawaii’s Kīlauea Volcano. This image was taken on January 31, 2013 in Kīlauea showing a small lava lake, which has been present on the northeast side of the crater floor for nearly a year.

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Curing Type 1 Diabetes with Gene Therapy

Curing Type 1 Diabetes with Gene Therapy

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Type 1 diabetes mellitus (sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes) is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas produces little or no insulin. People with this form of diabetes require injections of insulin every day to control the glucose levels in their blood, or they will die.

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Lung Cancer Cell Dividing

Lung Cancer Cell Dividing

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STEVE GSCHMEISSNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

In honour of World Cancer Day (Feb 4th 2013) this week I thought this photo would be fitting. This is a scanning electron micrograph (STEM), coloured by Steve Gscheissner, of a lung cancer cell dividing.

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Explosion On The Sun

Explosion On The Sun

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On August 31, 2012 a long filament of solar material that had been hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona, erupted out into space.

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Chugach Transient Alaskan Orcas

Chugach Transient Alaskan Orcas

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Photo by Eva Saulitis, North Gulf Oceanic Society

This beautiful shot taken last summer in Resurrection Bay, showing six of the seven remaining Chugach transient orcas in existence, is this weeks Science Photo of the Week. Click here for the larger version.

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